Skip to content

It Didn’t Come Off (39)

September 27, 2017

The tears that streamed from my eyes left my brother quite at a loss. I made up my mind to trust him with my secret, and I was not a little surprised to learn that he had met Yelena more than once and had been able to form a fairly definite opinion of her from the words of a friend of his “who was on intimate terms with her,” added Misha, smiling. She had been brought up in an honest family and had married a man of her choosing, but not even two years had gone by before she was adroitly deceiving her husband, who left her. Misha had no idea she had gone to Ryazan.

“She’ll probably stick to her guns and get Gornov,” he remarked.

“Well, I don’t think Gornov will put up with a woman like that.”

“She’ll know how to make sure he does. God willing, he’ll even come to think hers is an inexhaustible well of honor. It wasn’t for nothing that she tore Varenka’s note out of Lavrov’s hands. That must be why he writes that he’s encountered a source of friendship and sympathy he’s done nothing to deserve, which is helping him bear his sorrow.”

These words awakened in me a bitter feeling of jealousy. It seemed I would have given half my life to be able to trace Gornov’s thoughts, to learn the secret of how things stood between him and Yelena, to know every word that passed between them, as if this new trial would put my soul at ease. I attempted to write to Gornov a few times but was held back by the thought, “isn’t it too late?”

Finally the summer months passed. We moved back to Moscow, and our life in society resumed its former course, but I frequently declined to go on outings, pleading illness. Fortunately Varenka and I grew close. Khmelyov, after marrying her, had received his inheritance and since then had reconciled with his mother-in-law and the entire family. Varenka saw me often and soon understood the secret of my voluntary renunciation of society.

Once I asked if I could go visit her for a whole day. She ran out to meet me and announced that Gornov had returned to Moscow after a six-month absence and would spend the evening at her house.


previous installment
next installment
“It Didn’t Come Off” is a translation of “Не сошлись” (1867) by Ol’ga N. (Sophie Engelhardt).


Слезы, брызнувшие из моих глаз, совершенно сбили с толку брата. Я решилась поверить ему свою тайну, и к немалому моему удивлению, я узнала, что он встречал не раз Елену и успел составить о ней довольно определенное мнение со слов одного приятеля, «который с ней был в коротких отношениях», прибавил Миша, улыбаясь. Она воспитывалась в честном семействе и вышла замуж по склонности, но не прошло двух лет, как уже ловко обманывала мужа, который ее оставил. Об ее поездке в Рязань Миша не имел понятия.

— Она, пожалуй, поставит на своем, завладеет Горновым, заметил он.

— А я думаю, что Горнов не помирится с такою женщиной.

— Она сумеет помирить его с собой. Бог даст, еще увидит в ней неисчерпаемую бездну чести. Недаром она вырвала у Лаврова Варенькину запиcку. То-то он и пишет, что встретил совершенно незаслуженное им чувство дружбы и симпатии, которое помогает ему переносить его горе.

Эти слова пробудили во мне горькое чувство ревности. Я дала бы, кажется, полжизни, чтобы проследить мысли Горнова, угадать тайну отношений его к Елене, узнать каждое слово, которым они обменялись, как будто бы это новое испытание должно было облегчить мою душу. Я покушалась несколько раз написать к Горнову, но меня удерживала мысль: «Не поздно ли?»

Наконец миновали летние месяцы. Мы переехали в Москву, и наша светская жизнь установилась прежним порядком, но я часто отказывалась от выездов под предлогом нездоровья. К счастию, я сошлась с Варенькой. Хмелев, женившись на ней, получил наследство и с тех пор помирился с своею тещей и со всем семейством. Варенька со мной часто видалась и скоро поняла тайну моего добровольного отречения от света.

Раз я к ней отпросилась на целый день. Она выбежала ко мне навстречу и объявила, что Горнов вернулся в Москву, после полугодового отсутствия, и проведет вечер у ней.

No comments yet

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

%d bloggers like this: